The digestive system with sections labeled: esophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder, duodenum, pancreas, small intestine, ileum, appendix, cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and anus.
The digestive system with sections labeled: esophagus, stomach, liver, gallbladder, duodenum, pancreas, small intestine, ileum, appendix, cecum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid colon, rectum, and anus.
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This is a dog stoamch.
This is a dog stoamch.
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These powerful contractions constitute a very effective gastric grinder; they occur about 3 times per minute in people and 5 to 6 times per minute in dogs

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The human body needs fuel to live. We eat food for fuel. But just getting the food into the body is only a small part of the process. The food must be broken down into chemicals that the body can use. This whole process is called digestion. Some of the organs involved in digestion are the mouth, esophagus, stomach, small and large intestines, gallbladder, pancreas and liver. Follow the lizards to find out how the body uses the food we eat.
  • Ghrelin is produced in the stomach and upper intestine in the absence of food in the digestive system and stimulates appetite.
  • Peptide YY is produced in the digestive tract in response to a meal in the system and inhibits appetite.

Digestion involves mixing food with digestive juices, moving it through the digestive tract, and breaking down large molecules of food into smaller molecules. Digestion begins in the mouth, when you chew and swallow, and is completed in the small intestine.


The major hormones that control the functions of the digestive system are produced and released by cells in the mucosa of the stomach and small intestine. These hormones are released into the blood of the digestive tract, travel back to the heart and through the arteries, and return to the digestive system where they stimulate digestive juices and cause organ movement.
Digestion involves the mixing of food, its movement through the digestive tract, and the chemical breakdown of the large molecules of food into smaller molecules. This article provides an overview of the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. Written in a question-and-answer format, the article covers the importance of digestion, the mechanics of digestion, movement of food through the digestive tract, the production of digestive juices (from the salivary glands to the stomach, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas), the absorption and transport of nutrients (carbohydrates, protein, fats, vitamins), and how the digestive process is controlled
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